Item #42310 Northward Over the "Great Ice". A Narrative of Life and Work along the Shores and upon the Interior Ice-Cap of Northern Greenland in the Years 1886 and 1891-1897. With a description of the little tribe of Smith-Sound Eskimos, the most northerly human beings in the world, and an account of the discovery and bringing home of the "Saviksue", or Great Cape-York Meteorites. Robert E. PEARY.

Northward Over the "Great Ice". A Narrative of Life and Work along the Shores and upon the Interior Ice-Cap of Northern Greenland in the Years 1886 and 1891-1897. With a description of the little tribe of Smith-Sound Eskimos, the most northerly human beings in the world, and an account of the discovery and bringing home of the "Saviksue", or Great Cape-York Meteorites.

New York. Frederick A. Stokes Company. 1914. sm4to. 25.5x 19cm, the 2nd edition, in 2 volumes, lxxx,521 & xiv,625pp., with c.800 plates and illustrations from photographs, rear folding map, in the original cross ribbed dark purple cloth, gilt titles on the spine and upper cover, wormed in the text between pages v2. 155-212, otherwise internally clean and sound on heavy high quality finished paper, spine slightly faded, a very good to fine sound set, rare, there are 125 listing on one site with only one in this collectable condition. (Ar). Item #42310

Second edition published without changes in a large paper format, 25.5x 19cm. The first editions were 8vo, published in 1898 in New York and London (22.5x 16cm). - A.B. 13231. With description of the little tribe of Smith-Sound Inhuits, the most northerly human beings in the world, and an account of the discovery and bringing home of the "Saviksue", or great Cape York meteorites. A.B. 13231. The record of Peary's Arctic expeditions up to 1897. His achievements included the determination of the northern most extension of the ice cap and the insularity of Greenland, together with the gathering of a mass of scientific and ethnographic data. As a result of his experiences Peary had come to the conclusion that the only practicable means for reaching the North Pole consisted in pushing a ship as far northward as possible to a winter harbor on the Greenland coast, and then early in spring traveling with dogs and sledges due north until the Pole was attained' (DAB). Peary was undoubtedly the most driven, possibly the most successful, and probably the most unpleasant man in the annals of polar exploration' (Fleming, Ninety Degrees North p284.). Unlike most previous explorers, Peary studied the Inuit survival techniques, built igloos and dressed in practical furs in the native fashion both for heat preservation and to dispense with the extra weight of tents and sleeping bags when on the march. Peary also relied on the Inuit as hunters and dog-drivers on his expeditions, and pioneered the use of the system (which he called the "Peary system") of using support teams and supply caches for Arctic travel. (Triple sledging had actually been used by the British Franklin rescue missions forty years prior). His wife, Josephine, accompanied him on several of his expeditions. During the course of his explorations, he had eight toes amputated. Peary was the author of several books, the most famous being Northward over the Great Ice (1898) and The North Pole (1910).

Price: $600.00 save 25% $450.00

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